Pearl barley risotto recipe with a creamy vegetarian seitan stew

Ingredients for pearl barley risotto recipe with a creamy vegetarian seitan stew

  • 1,5 Veggie Protein Blocs
  • 200 g cashew nuts
  • 1.5 L yeast-free vegetable stock
  • 250 ml white wine
  • 250 g pearl barley
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 small onion
  • 1 pinch fleur de sel (Amanprana)
  • 1 pinch pepper
  • 2 tsp seasoning mix (Amanprana ORAC Botanico mix)
  • 4 tbsp coconut blossom sugar (Amanprana Gula Java Brut)

Preparation of pearl barley risotto recipe with a creamy vegetarian seitan stew

  1. Soak the cashew nuts for at least four hours in 600 ml of cold water, then purée in a blender to form a cashew nut cream.
  2. Peel the onions and garlic and cut into thin slices.
  3. Fry half of the onions and garlic with the seitan until brown, add a little fleur de sel and pepper and remove from the heat.
  4. Cover and set aside while you cook the risotto.
  5. Fry the remaining onions and garlic in a little olive oil, add the pearl barley and cook without allowing it to change colour.
  6. Deglaze the pot with the white wine, add half the cashew nut cream and cook, stirring continuously.
  7. When the pearly barley starts to stick to the bottom of the pot, add some vegetable stock and continue to stir.
  8. Repeat this process until the barley risotto is al dente.
  9. Season to taste with a little fleur de sel, pepper and seasoning mix, and keep the risotto warm.
  10. Return the seitan to the frying pan to reheat.
  11. Deglaze the pan with a dash of white wine, then add the remaining cashew nut cream.
  12. Allow to simmer until you have a nice creamy sauce.
  13. Add the coconut blossom sugar and stir until dissolved.
  14. Season to taste and serve with the risotto. Bon appetit!

Tip of Stefano:

Hulled barley, pot barley and pearl barley What’s the difference? Different barley types explained

Hulled barley is made by removing the outer husk from the barley kernel, while pot barley is made by lightly polishing hulled barley. So pot barley is just more refined hulled barley. Barley used to be a popular grain, but is now mainly eaten by animals as an ingredient in animal feed. However, we use barley more often than many people think, since it’s one of the key ingredients in beer. So what’s pearl barley? To make pot barley, around 15% of the kernel is ground away. For pearl barley, closer to 30% of the kernel is ground away, making it nice and round like a pearl.

Cooking pearl barley. What’s the best way to do it? Ideally in a risotto

Pearl barley is a great substitute for risotto rice. If you’re trying to choose between pearl barley, pot barley and hulled barley, the latter is the most wholegrain version, with a very firm texture. The softest and most delicate is pearl barley, with pot barley somewhere in the middle. All types of barley take quite a long time to cook. It’s best to soak barley in advance, preferably overnight. After soaking, bring the barley to the boil and leave to simmer for at least an hour, preferably two or three. There are plenty of possibilities for faster meals with each of the different types of barley, and there are also pre-cooked varieties available. Always check the packaging to find out the best way to cook each particular type of barley. In any case, it’s worth the trouble and the time spent on preparation, because barley is certainly yummy! This recipe uses pearl barley as a substitute for traditional risotto rice.

Stefano Vicinoadio kok en fan van Bertyn

Stefano Vicinoadio

Who is Stefano Vicinoadio? Here at Bertyn we got to know him at an organic fair in Germany. We immediately hit it off and it turned into a great working relationship. Stefano is actually a photographer, and it is his passion. But his love for cooking has resulted in the most delicious recipes... together with great photos.

Stefano describes himself as colourful, loud, a vegan, a friend, a discoverer, a digital nomad and straightforward. Stefano changed tack and started to eat and live a healthy vegan lifestyle His life took a wholly different course when he became very ill. At the age of 33 he was going with all guns blazing, but he didn't spare a thought for his own health - he smoked, drank a lot, worked up to 16 hours a day and drank around two litres of coffee daily. Then he developed two serious hernias, as well as being very overweight. He realised that he could not continue this way and decided on a complete turnaround. He quit drinking and smoking and slowly changed his diet, until he finally went almost completely vegan. Vegan, a step further than vegetarian Stefano's recipes are all vegan. A vegan eats no animal products whatsoever, taking it a step beyond vegetarianism. Vegans don't eat eggs, dairy products or honey. These recipes by Stefano will prove to you that there's still a great deal left to work with. See the recipes and try them out for yourself!

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What fans say about Bertyn

Claudia Hirschberger

Blogger

“I often use seitan when I dice it so that it resembles diced meet. Dishes such as ´Seitan Stroganoff´ and ´Züri Seitan-Geschnätzi´ all gain from the firm texture and from the slightly sweet taste of the seitan”

“The soya sauce has a very distinct taste, in which the product is mostly offered already marinated. To me this taste forms a harmonious combination with other ingredients. I rinse the seitan well before using it, so that the aroma does not dominate and I add salt sparingly”