Setian Stoofvlees

Kookinspiratie?

Doorzoek onze database meer dan 200 recepten, om heerlijke gerechten te maken met Seitan!

De Eiwit kampioen

DE EIWIT KAMPIOEN!

Seitan van Bertyn bevat 68% meer eiwit dan een kipfilet! Met Bertyn Tops heb je snel een ideale maaltijd voor na je workout met meer dan 30g eiwitten!

Eiwitrijke lunch, bekijk onze gezonde recepten

LUNCHEN!

De seitan van Bertyn leent zich ook perfect voor de bereiding van een gezonde en smaakvolle lunch. Bekijk onze lunch recepten!

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Seitan of Bertyn is full of protein – a real protein champion

Bertyn makes authentic seitan. Our seitan is vegetarian and high in protein, to name just some great properties. At Bertyn, we think it’s important that we make our products as environmentally friendly as possible. This combination makes our seitan a product which we proudly stand behind, and which is prepared in an authentic way with high-quality organic raw materials

What is seitan?

Seitan comes from the Japanese words “sei”, meaning “to be, become, made of”, and “tan”, as in tanpaku, which means “proteins”. Freely translated: “made of proteins”.

Seitan is a high-protein product, usually made of wheat flour, spelt flour or gluten. Seitan has a high content of wheat or spelt proteins which are rich in gluten. Bertyn seitan is “bio”, in other words, it’s made of organic ingredients.

More than 1,000 years ago, seitan was prepared by Zen Buddhists in China and Japan as a substitute for meat or fish.

In the Chinese kitchen, seitan is called Mian juin (mien chin or mien ching). Chinese Buddhist Mahayana monks ate seitan; they were strict vegans. Today, Chinese and Vietnamese restaurants may serve ‘mock duck’ or ‘mock chicken’, an alternative for duck or chicken, made of seitan. Mock duck or mock chicken is often prepared with peanuts or mushrooms. The Chinese regularly eat seitan for breakfast, with cooked rice porridge (congee).

In the Japanese kitchen, seitan is often translated into “fu”, meaning “gluten”. The Japanese philosopher George Ohsawa (1893-1966) brought seitan to the West in the early 1960s. To many people, George Ohsawa symbolises macrobiotics. In the Vietnamese kitchen, seitan is often called ‘mi cang’ or ‘mi can’, referring to wheat gluten. Together with tofu, seitan forms part of the Buddhist Vietnamese kitchen, which was highly influenced by China. In the vegetarian and vegan kitchen, seitan is eaten as a protein supply or meat substitute. Many vegetarians and vegans prefer organic seitan to tofu or tempeh.

Seitan vs. meat

DescriptionKcal per 100gProportion kcals from proteinsMg cholesterol per 100 kcalProportion kcal from fats
Seitan11883%02%
Turkey (white meat)10684%1511%
Chicken fillet15776%3523%
Beef (lean) or loin roast12669%6229%
Roast pork or chops19638%4061%
Hamburger27230%2266%
Egg (boiled)15435%32063%
Protein and amino acid: Seitan is the protein champion

Inspiration to cook with bertyn

view our recipes

What fans say about Bertyn

Pasquale Tarantino

Fitness consultant

“When you cook seitan the taste depends on the spices you use, because seitan does not have much of a taste of its own. Thanks to its firm structure, seitan can be fried, roasted or barbecued, or simply on a pizza. You can find seitan in the cold section of your natural food and health food shops.”